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Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007

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via E-Mail:
info@digento.de  Contact/Order: info@digento.de

Online

Verlag :: Publisher

Adam Matthew Digital

 

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Preise auf Anfrage / Prices on request

Das Angebot richtet sich nicht an Verbraucher i. S. d. § 13 BGB und Letztverbraucher i. S. d. PAngV.

Bestellnummer bei digento :: digento order number

105649

Verlagsinformation :: Publisher's information

The first phase of Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007, Online has just been released. This outstanding new digital portal for slavery studies will be released in three phases (2007, 2008 and 2009) with regular updates in the interim.

This extraordinary resource on trans-Atlantic slavery and abolition brings together original manuscript and rare printed material from dozens of libraries and archives across the Atlantic world, and will prove invaluable for postgraduate and scholarly research.

This project provides access to many thousands of original manuscripts, pamphlets, books, paintings, maps and images. Most are reproduced as high quality greyscale images, but there are also a significant number of colour images. All printed items are full text searchable and manuscripts have document level indexing. All documents have distinct URLs and can be embedded in course notes and reading lists or downloaded as PDFs.

Documents are presented alongside contextual essays contributed by leading academics in the field; each essay will have hypertext links to the primary sources it discusses.

Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007

This is an essential portal for slavery studies, bringing together documents and collections covering an extensive time period spanning six centuries, from libraries and archives across the Atlantic world. It offers:

- High quality greyscale and colour images of many thousands of original manuscripts, pamphlets, books, paintings, maps and images not available elsewhere

- Links to other online sources approved by scholars

- A series of contextual essays by leading authorities from around the world

- Designed for both teaching and research use, there is extensive coverage of topics such as the African Coast; the Middle Passage; the varieties of slave experience (urban, domestic, industrial, farm, ranch and plantation); Spiritualism and Religion; Resistance and Revolts; the Underground Railroad; the Abolition Movement; Legislation; Education; the Legacy of Slavery and Slavery Today.

There are many substantial clusters of material offering in-depth case studies in America, the Caribbean, Brazil and Cuba and there is fresh material examining European, Islamic and African involvement in this terrible trade.

Consultant Editors include:

- Rosanne Adderley (Tulane University)

- Emmanuel Akyeampong (Harvard University)

- Alex Byrd (Rice University)

- Rina Caceres (University of Costa Rica)

- Mariza de Carvalho Soares (Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil)

- José Curto (York University)

- Guy Grannum (The National Archives)

- Ariela Gross (University of Southern California)

- Rick Halpern (University of Toronto)

- Leslie Harris (Emory University)

- Joseph Inikori (Rochester University)

- Paul Lovejoy (York University)

- Susan O'Donovan (Harvard University)

- Olatunji Ojo (Syracuse University)

- Yolanda Pierce (University of Kentucky)

- Bryan Prince (Buxton National Historic Site)

- David Richardson (University of Hull)

- Brenda Square (Amistad Research Center)

- David Trotman (York University)

- Kate Wilson (Historical Society of Pennsylvania)

Source Libraries:

This project will be drawn from libraries and archives across the Atlantic World.

Section I features strong material from:

- Anti-Slavery International

- the British Library

- Buxton National Historic Site, Ontario

- Duke University

- Historical Society of Pennsylvania

- Institute of Commonwealth Studies

- Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa

- Louisiana State University

- Mariners Museum, Virginia

- Merseyside Maritime Museum

- The National Archives, Kew

- Wilberforce House, Hull

It also features links to many other crucial sources for the study of slavery and abolition in Africa, Europe, the Caribbean and North, South and Central America.

Nature of the Material:

This project provides access to many thousands of original manuscripts, pamphlets, books, paintings, maps and images. Most are reproduced as high quality greyscale images, but there are also a significant number of colour images. All printed items are full text searchable and manuscripts have document level indexing. All documents have distinct URLs and can be embedded in course notes and reading lists or downloaded as PDFs.

Scope of the Collection:

This extraordinary resource on trans-Atlantic slavery and abolition brings together original manuscript and rare printed material from dozens of libraries and archives across the Atlantic world. Published in three sections between 2007 and 2009, this collection will prove invaluable for postgraduate and scholarly research and will also provide a user-friendly classroom tool for undergraduates.

Documents are presented alongside contextual essays contributed by leading academics in the field; each essay will have hypertext links to the primary sources it discusses. The project will encompass all the major themes, including:

1) Slavery in the Early Americas

2) African Coast

3) Middle Passage

4) Slavery and Agriculture

Case Studies: American South, Caribbean, Brazil and Cuba

5) Urban and Domestic Slavery

6) Slave Testimony

7) Spiritualism and Religion in slave communities

8) Resistance and Revolts

9) Underground Railroad

10) The Abolition movement - spanning religious and ethnic boundaries

11) Legislation: Enactment and Enforcement

12) Freedmen and Free Black Settlements

13) Education

14) Slavery and the Islamic World

15) Varieties of Slave Experience

16) Slavery Today, Legacy of Slavery

17) The Evolution of Slavery

Section I has material covering many of these topics, but it is particularly strong in coverage of:

- the African Coast - there are records of the African Company, details of coastal forts, records of transactions and spectacular maps of the African Coast from the National Archives, as well as first hand descriptions of the operation of the slave trade on the west coast of Africa in papers held at the Bank of England Archives and the Merseyside Maritime Museum. We also provide original manuscript accounts by Samuel Crowther and James Africanus Horton of their experiences of slavery.

- the Middle Passage - sources from the British Library, the Mariners Museum and Wilberforce House describe the Middle Passage from a human, economic and medical perspective.

- Slavery and Agriculture - there are substantial groups of papers describing plantation life (and other forms of agricultural slavery) including the hitherto unpublished Castle Wemyss papers (Jamaican plantation estate papers) from the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, records of plantations in Georgia and South Carolina from the Historical Society of Philadelphia, letters and journals of Caribbean plantation overseers from Merseyside Maritime Museum and Wilberforce House, and the Uncle Sam Plantation Papers from Louisiana State University.

- the Abolition movement - we offer extensive coverage of the Slavery, Abolitionist and African-American pamphlets collections at Duke University (carefully screened to avoid duplication with other widely available sources) - these materials bring the debates over slavery to life and expose economic, religious and racist arguments for and against the trade. We also offer records of Benezet, Clarkson, Parker, Sharp and Wilberforce describing their experiences in the crusade for abolition and there are ships' logs and journals from the National Archives which describe naval actions against privateers and slavers.

- the Underground Railroad - both the Rankin/Parker papers from Duke University and material from the Buxton National Historic Site offer evidence concerning the functioning of the vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves.

- Slavery Today - Slavery did not end in 1807 (when the British Parliament voted to abolish the trade in slaves and the US House and Senate approved an Act to "Prohibit the Importation of Slaves into any Port or Place Within the Jurisdiction of the United States"), 1838 (when slavery was outlawed in the British Empire) or 1865 (when the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States declared that 'neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction') - recent publications and UN submissions of Anti-Slavery International show that it continues today and affects millions of people.

Sections II and III will build on these themes and will also provide detailed coverage of the other topics listed above.

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